A woman about to give birth.
A health worker who ignores an unfair order.
A worker who demands his rights.
A child who begins to discover the society he lives in.
A teacher persecuted for his identity.
A young woman in a hostile world.
Six stories which show the day to day of the Saharans who live in
the occupied territories of the Western Sahara.

DIRIGIDA POR CARLOS MOURE – MUSICA DE FERNANDO MARTINEZ –  PRODUCTORA EJECUTIVA RAQUEL CALVO – BASADA EN EL INFORME “UNA BRECHA EN EL MURO” – REALIZADO POR “AMIGO@S DE LA RASD DE ALAVA” – GUION,ANIMACION Y VFX POR CARLOS MOURE – AFX POR FERNANDO MARTINEZ – PRODUCIDA POR “OYKO STUDIO” Y “AMIGAS Y AMIGOS DE LA RASD DE ALAVA” – 2018

FACT SHEET

TITLE    A HOLE IN THE WALL

AUDIO    SPANISH

SUBTITLES    BASQUE, ARABIC, ENGLISH

YEAR OF CREATION    2018

DURATION     18´30´´ SHORT FILM

DIRECTION   CARLOS MOURE

SCRIPT    CARLOS MOURE

MUSIC AND AFX    FERNANDO MARTÍNEZ

ANIMATION AND VFX    CARLOS MOURE

AUDIO CAPTURE  FERNANDO MARTÍNEZ

PRODUCTION   OYKO STUDIO

ASOCIACIÓN DE AMIGAS

Y AMIGOS DE LA RASD DE ÁLAVA 

EXECUTIVE PRODUCTION    RAQUEL CALVO

 CARLOS MOURE

GENRE    DOCUMENTAL DE CREACIÓN

WEBSITES   UNAGUJEROENELMURO.COM

OYKOSTUDIO.COM

SAHARAELKARTEA.ORG 

MOVIE FRAME

ARBOL

THE STORY

“A HOLE IN THE WALL” is an Arabic mosaic, a set of pieces which fit together drawing lines, crosses and larger shapes, providing us with a glimpse of the reality which the Saharan people live behind the wall of silence built by Morocco around the Western Sahara. The first difficulty the director came up against was the impossibility of obtaining footage both of the territory and the inhabitants of the Western Sahara and of using their testimonies (obtained by young brigade members between 2014 and 2015, who managed to pass through that wall with the help of the communicators and activists of Equipe Media) whilst protecting their anonymity and avoiding possible retaliation.

It was therefore necessary, firstly to collect and put together a wide range of testimonies and personal experiences from both the Saharans who live in the Sahara and those who have been forced to flee their country, and also from the Westerners who have travelled there to hear and provide exposure to these stories.

Each of these intertwining short stories fits together to make up a mosaic which aims to show and denounce the daily reality of the Sahara.

 

THE DIRECTOR

The situations and stories gathered in the testimonies were so powerful that they needed to be told first hand by the protagonists themselves. Thus the idea of making a film representing these people was born; a film which reflected their day to day and allowed us to live their experiences with them. Familiar with using animation as a medium of expression, in this case it becomes especially important, enabling us to live these difficult stories in a simpler way, inviting us to connect with the protagonists much more quickly.

Just using the voices and a minimal outline of some frames, we did an initial montage which was extremely important for the creative process, as in this way we were given the first clues as to what the rhythm and tone of the film were going to be. Straight away I began working side by side with the musician Fernando Martinez, creating both the visual atmosphere and the sonic atmosphere at the same time, influencing and inspiring each other, in order to get the narrative of the story to flow in a more organic way. As far as aesthetics go, we decided on black and white, using light touches of colour only in those elements relevant to the story.

We also paid special attention to the drawing of this world, as we are talking about a documentary which tries to make visible the testimonies of these people. Therefore, we decided to create drawings which were more realistic than those normally used in animated films.  What’s more, we built up the drawings and frames as if we were looking through the lens, in an attempt to create the illusion of a movie camera, giving importance to aspects such as depth of field, glare, motion blur and other visual aspects appropriate to this medium.

Quite a number of characters, around 30, had to be designed. We again decided to move away from a perfect, highly finished aesthetic, giving more importance to texture - with something of a sandy feel - and to the effects of light on different materials. We combined this aesthetic with a very limited animation and a frenetic frame speed in order to try and create the sensation of stolen footage, brought from the other side of the wall to make us witnesses to these lives.

THE MUSIC

Fernando Martínez composed the soundtrack for ‘A Hole in the Wall’, following a meticulous job of listening to and studying the modes of Saharan music, its traditional instruments and its evolution since the 1970s.

Six stories. Six different visions in different spaces united by one cultural identity. This was the starting point, and in this way the music becomes the perfect medium for us to get closer to each of the characters, to put ourselves in their shoes, to experience their emotions, their fears and their desires. Also, at the same time, we are able to feel part of a more distant, but ever present whole.

In image production, it is usual for the music and the sound spaces to be designed post- montage, using audio recordings taken during the filming itself. Being animation, this project required a totally different process: first the audio dubs of the characters were recorded, then a first montage draft was made with these, followed by the music and effects.

The pieces of music were composed in parallel with the creation of the drawings, adapting and creating a mutual feedback between the two in order to achieve an ideal rhythm and narrative tone. We have had to invent sound spaces and effects due to being unable to record these within the setting of the occupied territories.

PRODUCTION

Raquel Calvo, took the reins of this project in the “Asociación de Amigos y Amigas de la RADS” (Association of Friends of The Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic, SADR ) in order to look at ways of making the content of the investigation visible. She contacted OYKO STUDIO and work began on the various possibilities. Little by little, the idea took shape of making an audiovisual piece. It also became clear that animation would be the best tool to tell the story whilst maintaining the anonymity of the participants.
Raquel was responsible both for organising the initial interviews with former co-ordinators and people from “Equipe Media” in order to facilitate the film makers’ work, and also for finding the voices of the characters among the Saharans who live outside the occupied territories, in addition to finding locations in which to record the interviews and carry out other production tasks.

     THE
VOICES OF
EXILE

Twenty two exiled Saharans living in the Basque Country have provided the voices for the characters in ‘A Hole in the Wall’. Their voices and accents speak of the life journey of the Saharan people following the occupation of their territory by Morocco and in its previous time as a Spanish colony. On top of the Arab accents, we can hear Basque, Andalusian or Caribbean notes. Some of these voices belong to Saharans from the Western Sahara who were forced to leave following the Green March, whilst other voices have never been heard there, having been born in exile. The film shows dialogues between these people and those who still remain in the occupied territory.

     THE
BRIGADE MEMBERS

The young people who carried out the study and collation of data in the occupied territories, together with the subsequent report, also take an active part in the audiovisual pieces in which we show how those interviews took place. In these audiovisual pieces, they interview the characters, thus providing information from the testimonies which, for narrative reasons, could not be included in the film.

INTERVIEWS